Span 101 Songs: Qué bonito by Rosario

TL;DR: I am teaching a pop song of the week for all 14 weeks of my fall 2019 first- semester Spanish course. Scroll down to find my Google Slides and handout for the song “Qué bonito” by Rosario all linked and ready for you to copy, adapt, edit, and use if they might be useful for you!

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This is my third in a series of posts about my plans to do a song of the week for all 14 weeks of my fall Span 101 course. So far I know the first day of class, which is typically syllabus day, we will be listening to “La gozadera” and a few days later for the the official week one song we’ll do “Criminal”.

This blog post is for the song “Qué bonito” by Rosario. I feel the need to say that the syllabus, textbook, and course schedule that I have been assigned are not negotiable, and they require stem-changing verbs and family vocabulary in week 6. (It pains me to even write that I am teaching stem-changing verbs as a concept, but that’s what’s up. It’s a traditional textbook and I have to make sure my students get a similar experience to students in my colleagues’ courses. If you want to challenge me on this, I am super open to the conversation!)

Obviously I’m not doing these songs in order. I did the first week and then jumped into week 6. Actually, I am also halfway through week 7 and will swing back around to get back to work on week 2 after that. I just got inspired for the middle of the semester all of a sudden, and I can’t really resist inspiration. (BTW, weeks 1, 2, 6, and 7 are all the weeks I have decided on songs for so far. Weeks 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 are TBD. Yikes!) 

One personal note about this song: I have listened to it about 7000 (más o menos) times since last June when my oldest friend passed away. There are a handful of songs that I associate with my friend, some because she loved them (“Se me sigue olvidando” by Marc Anthony), some because they remind me of her strength and fearlessness (“Sin miedo” by Rosana) and some because, like “Qué Bonito”, the lyrics capture what it’s like to live on, to keep going with so much love and so many good memories and with that person feeling so close. I think my students might be able to make a connection with the song as well.

I’m looking for catchy songs, but that doesn’t mean that every song has to be a banger. A little genuine emotion and shared experience will be good. The title of the song translates to something like “How lovely”, and it really is a lovely little song.

 

 

 

Specifically, this song and accompanying materials will help my students:

  • use family vocabulary to understand the singer and the origin story of the song
  • see several present tense verbs in an authentic context
  • hear yet another new regional accent — this may turn out to be our first artist from Spain
  • use the simple lyrics as a scaffolded, jumping-off point for their own creative writing

Here are the materials I plan to use:

All my teaching explanations are in the slide notes. If you have any questions or comments, please ask!!

Please feel very free to use, modify, and improve the resources I have posted here, although I do have a couple of requests. 1) Click on the Creative Commons license below to check out the terms of my Share-Alike license. Basically, feel free to take and use, but if you share your derivation, share freely!  2) If you change them or make them better, please share with me so I can make my own work better for my students!

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

 

cover que bonito

By staceymargarita

I am a language teacher and researcher. In any given term, I may teach beginning or intermediate Spanish courses, English for international students, and foreign language teaching methods for teacher candidates and future faculty. As a teacher, I consider myself pragmatic (not married to any particular approach), oriented towards critical pedagogies in particular, a technophile, and always on the prowl for new ideas.

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